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Hug-A-Bub wrap carrier

I’d heard a lot of good things about the Hug-A-Bub babywearing moby wrap. In fact, somewhere or other it was listed as being the best baby carrier in Australia. It’s touted as being the best for baby’s back, while offering close contact between bub and babywearer. This all sounded good, so I decided to give it a go. We loaded up our newborn and took a raccoon-eyed trip down to Baby Bunting to buy a wrap. They were running out of stock at the time, so we ended up with the slightly cheaper pocketless wrap, which they don’t seem to have anymore.

Sean was happy to try it out, and was quite pleased to walk down to his favourite cafe and get his latte with Amelia strapped to his chest. The staff there were overwhelmed by cuteness.

We tried using it out and about in the early days, but it was a little awkward, and wrapping the thing around your body without getting it all dirty on the ground is nigh on impossible. You need to have it on before you head out, which doesn’t leave much room for adjustments if you’ve set it up wrong. Thus, the pram was favoured over the wrap for outings.

Around the house, it took me a little while to get into the idea – out of sight, out of mind, it would stay hanging off the coat stand, while I tried my best to get housework done and placate a baby who really just wanted (and still wants) to be held at least most of the time. The baby swing worked for the first few weeks, but after that it got a little trickier.

So eventually I remembered the wrap, and out it came. I carefully arranged it according to the instructions on the DVD, placed my baby inside, and went about my business. At first it felt comfortable and good, but about half an hour later the whole thing would start to come loose and poor Milly would end up with her face around my belly-button and her body squashed up like a pretzel. It seems that you need to allow for the crossed part of the fabric, where baby’s bum goes, to really settle and scootch down.

Today I did it up higher than ever before. Sure enough, I was able to wear it for about 45 minutes without it moving as I bent up and down and moved about doing housework. However it was quit uncomfortable, putting strain on the middle of my back. I’m not sure if there’s just something I’m doing wrong – everyone seems to say how comfy it is – or what, but I’ve become keenly interested in backpack-style carriers, particularly the Manduca, which transfers the weight to the hips rather than the back. I’d love to find a local baby carrier library where I can try out some different options and see what works for us. If I can get motivated and actually do that soon, I’ll report back here with the results!

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Why we put blankets over prams

Pre-baby, I never really understood why mums would put a blanket up over their baby’s pram while bub was sleeping. Were they really so precious that the couldn’t handle a bit of light
while taking a nap? (I know, I was a bit of an opinionated jerk). Now, of course, I have my own baby and it all makes sense. In fact, I’m sitting on a train right now (first train ride with Amelia, into the city no less! It has gone well so far, and we’re heading home) and I have put a muslin cloth over her pram. Continue reading

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Twelve weeks today

Yesterday Amelia was feeling particularly photogenic, modelling her hoodie

I don’t have a nice picture to show for today. Amelia is twelve weeks old, and is currently going through a ‘leap’ week according to the Wonder Weeks app (installed on my iPhone). The app says that my girl is currently going through her third developmental leap, which is described as “the world of smooth transitions.” Associated abilities include smoothly tracking a moving object by moving the head and eyes in a fluid motion (which Sean noticed as he walked across the room – at first it was cute, he said, but then it got creepy as she continued to stare at him while he moved about); trying out different vocal possibilities (also noted, with plenty of cooing, gooing, gurgling, squeaking and a wonderful assortment of other noises); and rolling from tummy to back with help (which she’s not as keen on, but has done a couple of times).

The reason I don’t have a picture from today is because leap weeks are an interesting time: today Miss Milly was in a predominantly cranky, clingy mood; she played for a while, then became overtired and screamed the house down while I madly scrambled about trying to find her dummy. As well as being generally unsettled, babies will feed more often than usual during their leap (and the same with growth spurts), and sleep in little snatches, so it quickly becomes very tiring. Luckily this will tend to only last a couple of days, so we should have happy baby back again in the next day or two!